Eco-sustainability of products

  • The substantial environmental impact of a common tyre during its useful life is estimated to be 90% of the globa impact during its whole life
  • It has been estimated that during its life cycle, a tyre produces debris that represents between 10% and 14% of the tyre’s weight
  • Research and development will enable the Group to eliminate highly aromatic oils from its entire worldwide product line by 2013

In 2001 the study Life Cycle Assessment of an average European car tyre (Prè Consultants B.V. on behalf of BLIC, 2001) highlighted the substantial environmental impact of a common tyre during its useful life, which is far greater than its impact during the other two phases, manufacturing and end of life.

According to this publication, about 90% of the impact during this phase results from the consumption of fuel caused by friction between the tyre and road surface, while the remaining portion stems from interaction between the environment and the solid particles released by the tyre due to its contact with the road surface (i.e. tyre debris).

It has been estimated that during its life cycle, a tyre produces debris that represents between 10% and 14% of the tyre’s weight. The impact of these debris particles is still being studied at the international level. The Pirelli Group is monitoring this issue through a constant exchange of information and experience with other tyre manufacturers, and participates in the specific working group set up by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.

In order to minimise the environmental impact associated with tyre use, Pirelli is constantly engaged in the design and development of compounds and product lines that, by using new materials, innovative internal structures and different tread designs, can reduce rolling resistance while guaranteeing the same performance. Pirelli is actively developing and using a series of new, increasingly ecological materials for compounds.
Research and development will enable the Group to eliminate highly aromatic oils from its entire worldwide product line by 2013.

In 2010 Pirelli continued research on raw materials from renewable sources that will lead it to produce ecological silica derived from food processing scraps (rice husks).